Interested in Sustainable Energy including Nuclear?

kicAre you interested in the future of Sustainable Energy? If your answer is yes, find out the possibilities of KIC InnoEnergy Master School. International Master Programs offering unique mobility options, a combination of engineering and innovation, and funding through scholarships /tuition waivers to the majority of their students.

When: 18th October, 1 – 2pm
Where: David Hume Tower LG.06

EIT InnoEnergy believe in a network of students, researchers and professionals from different nations combining their knowledge to create and innovate sustainable solutions for the future.

KIC InnoEnergy Master School is a European based institution offering 7 different Master programs within the field of sustainable energy. Programs are supported by a consortium of 11 technical universities, 2 top business schools, 6 research institutes and 7 leading industry partners around Europe. This enables pan-European collaborations between students, institutions and industry. They believe that engineering should be combined with innovation and commercial awareness. Students therefore attend two of Europe’s top Business Schools studying management and entrepreneurship courses.

Master programs include those in:  Renewable energy, Environomical Pathways for Sustainable Energy Systems, Smart Electrical systems and networks, Nuclear Energy, Energy for Smart Cities, Energy Technologies

Partner Universities are located in

Sweden – KTH Royal Institute of Technology & UU Uppsala University
Germany – KIT Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
France – ENSTA Paris Tech & Grenoble INP
Spain – UPC Polytechnic University of Barcelona
Portugal – IST Technical Institute of Lisbon
Poland – AGH University of Science and Technology & Silesian University of Technology
Netherlands – Technical University of Eindhoven
Belgium – University of Leuven 

To register for this event, please click on this booking link.

Details of this event can also be found on MyCareerHub.

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Scottish physicists win five IOP medals

Five out of sixteen IOP awards went to Scottish physicists this year.

IOP Awards recognise teams and individuals who have made a substantial contribution to the development or reputation of physics in the UK or Ireland. You can find out more about their work in academia and in industry on the IOP news website

One of the winners is Dr Graeme Malcolm received the Swan Medal award for his role in founding M Squared Lasers, and his contribution to the design and manufacture of transformative award-winning photonics products. The IOP’s president, Professor Roy Sambles said:

“the revolutionary technology M Squared develops has global impact” and that this was in no small part due to Malcolm’s drive and commitment to his work.

Malcolm has created two multi-million pound companies. Together, they generate more than £300m and employ around 150 high-level graduates and PhDs, designing more than 25 world-class products and exporting high-value laser systems all over the world.

M Squared Lasers is now one of the UK’s highest-growth technology companies. with more than 70 staff specialising in the development and manufacture of high-performance lasers for aiding research into quantum technologies, chemical sensing and biophotonics. You can find out more about it and Malcolm’s work here.

Previous winners of the Swan Business & Innovation medals include those working in KP Technology, IBM Research, Renishaw, Oxford Instruments Nanoscience, Cambridge Display Technology, Andor Technology.

Like a list?

In some sectors, you have to be a lot more proactive to find employers, do some research on them and make direct approaches. Physicists are naturally curious people but pragmatic. A list is always useful…

Physics Connect lists thousands of scientific companies, businesses, non-profit organizations, institutions and experts worldwide.  You can find the searchable directory here. You can also sign up to a weekly newsletter. Find organisations doing work you like the sound of and contact them to see if they will consider your CV. Make your CV and cover letter targeted to them and it will make a really positive impression.

More advice on CVs and cover letters here

Data science winter fellowship: MSc students and final year PhDs

The Data Incubator is a Cornell-funded data science training organization. They offer a free intensive 8 week fellowship that prepares masters students, PhDs, and postdocs in STEM fields seeking industry careers as data scientists. The program is supported by sponsorships from hundreds of employers across multiple industries. A variety of innovative companies partner with The Data Incubator for their hiring and training needs, including LinkedIn, Genentech, Capital One, Pfizer, and many others.

Who Should Apply

Anyone who has already obtained a masters or PhD degree or who is within one year of graduating with a masters or PhD is welcome to apply. Applications from international students are welcome. Everyone else is encouraged to sign-up for a future session.

More details on their website

Data Science in 30 minutes: Learn how to build a data-science project in their upcoming free Data Science in 30-minutes webcast. Signup soon as space is limited.

European Space Agency: my summer internship experience

Tara is a final year student here at Edinburgh. She wrote her first blogpost about applying to the European Space Agency (ESA). Here is her second blogpost where she talks about what she did and what she learnt about the job, the ESA, the people – and herself.

“With my traineeship at ESA slowly coming to an end, it’s time to look back at the many memorable experiences made and interesting people I met. In the 2 months that I stayed in Darmstadt, a 20 min train ride from Frankfurt, I learnt about the professionalism in the agency and how important good communication between colleagues is. I learnt what it’s like to work independently besides one of the best mission analysts in the world and also receive constructive criticism once in a while.

My job at ESA was to improve an orbit determination software called DITAN, which was used for low-thrust trajectories such as the mission BepiColombo to Mercury in 2018.

tara-esa-satellite

Artist’s impression of BepiColombo in front of Mercury. Credit: ESA – P. Carril

Naturally as an Astrophysics student I was afraid that my programming wasn’t up to scratch but luckily I could pick up the most common routines  fairly quickly (so many nested if loops!). With the help of my very patient supervisor I learnt how to make code more elegant and use as little of it as possible. When I wasn’t debugging the Fortran 5000-plus-liner (yes, in the space sector everything gets recycled, including ancient programs from the 70s) tea breaks would take up second priority, as many staff would joke. The canteen was the meeting place of different sections, ages and nationalities.

Besides work, other topics of interest such as politics (Brexit more than once) and even personal bests at the last triathlon as part of ESA’s sports clubs were discussed. Similar to all the societies and clubs Edinburgh University offers, ESA has a smaller range of activities to make different nationalities feel at home. During one of the after-work wakeboarding events I noticed once again that ESA really supports a good working atmosphere and also emphasises positive and open thinking whilst not forgetting to be critical as well.

Sharing an office with 4 trainees and contractors from Hungary, Belgium and Germany also gave me an insight into their work, although some of their French conversations as one of ESA’s working languages surpassed my 6-weeks taster course level. Nevertheless, on multiple occasions we helped each other with technical issues or generally exchanged ideas and experiences. It was astounding that even though they had come from totally different walks of life their technical knowledge and the art of communicating this in an easily comprehendible way was exceptional. Not only in my department did I notice the conscientious and composed way in which trainees and staff would listen and respond.

As most of the staff are international, ESA hosts intercultural events such as the annual fun run, running 5 or 10 km with or without a costume as well as a BBQ, which is themed after a different country every year. This year they chose the UK and Northern Ireland, which the organisers claimed to have chosen before the Brexit campaign started (or they were testing all the British staff’s humour). Costumes ranged from business men, to green leprechauns or simply tea bags and was, besides the roasting temperatures that day, an all-round fun activity. The BBQ didn’t disappoint either and offered all sorts of traditional cuisine, alcoholic beverages such as Pimm’s and a performance by Scottish country dancers and a bagpipe player. And there was me in Germany, thinking I could escape the ever-present bagpipe-melodies known from Edinburgh.

tara-esa-group

Credit : ESA – Stefano de Padova

Another insightful event was the informal ‘space dinner’ with guest speaker Rolf Densing, director of operations at ESA, who spoke about the future in space and invited all guests to have a chat with him during the German dinner. Surprisingly his predecessor and German Astronaut Thomas Reiter made an appearance too. Although I missed my chance to speak to him, I overheard a story of him at the dinner table when he was sipping his morning coffee and let it drop in mid air still thinking he was in space! These little stories besides many others were exchanged during the meal and made the company even more enjoyable.

At the establishment I work at, the European Space Operations Centre, Security takes an important role since million-euro heavy satellites are operated from here. This meant I was obliged to wear a badge with my name and picture at all times and was checked every morning by the international security guards, who I’m sure knew everyone’s nationality off by heart and greeted them with “Guten Morgen”, “Buongiorno”, etc. Equally the staff returned the good deed with respect and a bright smile.

Possibly whoever is reading this thinks I’m exaggerating my appraisal for ESA, but with a 100% success rate for all its launched missions, its expertise is world leading and I couldn’t have imagined a better placement with such a lively and proactive vibe to it.

If you can, I would always recommend gaining some work experience in the summer, since it not only gives you a head start in job applications but also teaches you a lot about if the job is right for you in the first place. That said, I’m considering a career in the space sector more than ever before and could imagine working as a trainee for ESA or in the space industry after graduating. Equipped with my new-found motivation to pursue this goal I’m curious which challenges await when I return to Edinburgh!”

Bright Recruits – IOP recruitment site

This website has some great videos giving you an insight into what jobs involve and where they are. Here is just one of them. Bright Recruits also advertises job for physicists in a wide range of academic and industrial sectors. You can search by specialism, there is an Employer A-Z and a search for graduate jobs. Good careers advice too!

Find more here

Are you a problem-solver?

Could you get excited about a career that allows you to solve some of the most complex problems that the world’s businesses, governments, non-governmental organizations, and non-for-profits face? If the answer is “yes”  a career in consulting could suit you.

McKinsey is coming to Edinburgh on 3oth September to introduce penultimate and final-year undergraduate, and master’s students, to the work they do through an interactive case study workshop. Designed and delivered by McKinsey consultants, you will get the opportunity to:

  • Learn problem-solving skills that will help you in your academic work, as well as other job applications
  • Be guided through the interview process
  • Network with McKinsey consultants over drinks to get all your questions answered

Closing date is 22nd September so find out more and apply here

Need a bit of  inspiration? Several of our physics graduates have gone into consulting. Check their profiles on LinkedIn

Oliver

Elaine

Thomas (with an Ordinary degree)

Jarand

PhD Internships with Edinburgh Research & Innovation

Intellectual Property Management and Commercialisation PhD Intern (Employ.ed for PhDs)

There is a great opportunity for PhD interns to work at ERI on IP Management and Commercialisation. They are hiring up to 10 PhD students from a range of disciplines including Physical Sciences.

Closing date: Wednesday 21st Sept

Areas of interest include: medical imaging, therapeutics, regenerative medicine, digital communications, diagnostics, microelectronic devices, big data, sensors, new materials, catalysts

Apply on MyCareerHub:

https://mycareerhub.ed.ac.uk/students/jobs/detail/367683