Curious about Analytics & Technology?

BlackRock are running an event on Monday for STEM students. It will be on MyCareerHub but it’s short notice so I thought I’d give you a heads-up. Here’s what it’s about:

“In vast oceans of data, we seek the insights that can change outcomes. We dig deep to find the numbers behind the numbers and leverage our technology to provide solutions to our clients. Join us at our Edinburgh office to find out more about the Aladdin Client Service and Technology divisions and the opportunities available in these teams.

Discover Analytics & Technology @ BlackRock
When: Monday 2nd October 2017
Where: Edinburgh (travel expenses reimbursed)
Eligibility: You must be in your first, second, third or final year (SH/MPhys) studying a STEM degree at a Scottish University.
Register: Register and apply for your space at careers.blackrock.com/campusrecruitment

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CERN @ KB: grad roles & work experience offers

CERN will be on campus on 4th October – full details and signup will be on MyCareerHub

CERN offers tremendous opportunities for the right students to develop their skills and understanding through some of the most exciting and cutting edge projects in engineering, computing and physics.

Research STFC

Come along to this event to get an insight into engineering at CERN, with a talk from a senior CERN engineer on the experiments, facilities & what their work involves. This will be followed by a Q&A for which he will be joined by a representative of the CERN HR Talent Acquisition team who will introduce all opportunities at CERN.

CERN’s Summer Student Scheme and Technical Studentships are being advertised now on the Science & Technology Facilities Council site. Find out more on the STFC website.

Where are all the science jobs?

Interesting post from my colleague Elizabeth at the University of Manchester

University of Manchester Careers Blog

whereareallthesciencejobsIf you’re a science student who loves science, it can sometimes feel like all the jobs are for business students, engineers or computer scientists. This is to reassure you that there are ways of finding science jobs – if you know where to look.

Two alternatives are:

a) Look for science jobs which are being advertised

  • The pros – you know there is a job to be filled
  • The cons – so do lot of other people, so the competition will be high

b) Look for scientific employers and see if they have any jobs

  • The pros – they may have jobs to be filled, but if a job isn’t available now, they may keep you on file; this means that when a vacancy does occur, they may contact you before even considering advertising, so there is less competition
  • The cons – they may not be recruiting when you need…

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Fast track STEM teaching qualification

There is a new teacher education scheme at University of Dundee.  It’s a fast track STEM course which combines the one-year teaching qualification with the induction year.  The subjects it includes are Physics, Chemistry, Computing & Mathematics.

The benefits are that graduates will be in the classroom quicker and they are paid the probationer salary (£22,500) from the outset.  This is a two-year pilot and the first year of the course runs from January 2018 to January 2019.  You apply directly to the University of Dundee and the closing date is 17th October.

To find out more have a look at Dundee’s website

Dundee are still offering the more traditional PGDE Secondary alongside this new option.

Finding part-time work in Edinburgh

Keen to get some local part-time work? My colleague Kirsten gives you some tips

The Careers Service Blog

Careers Consultant Kirsten Roche gives advice on finding a part-time job.

We see lots of students who want a part-time job in Edinburgh. This can be trickier than many students first expect as there are lots of students in Edinburgh all trying to get the same jobs. The Careers Service can support you in finding a part-time job.

To get you started here are our top 5 tips on finding a part-time job in Edinburgh.

  1. Use MyCareerHub. Last year we advertised over 2500 part-time job opportunities. Also keep an eye on shop and restaurant windows as they will often advertise by putting a sign in the window asking for staff.
  2. Get your CV up to scratch. Finding part-time work in Edinburgh is competitive, you need to tailor your CV to the type of work you are looking. Find out how to do this by looking at our resources on…

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Tips from a 4th year for all our new students

Starting at university can feel overwhelming. Getting advice from a fellow student is always reassuring. Take advantage of Kate’s wise words

The Careers Service Blog

Kate, our summer intern who is starting her fourth year now, sends good wishes to all our new students.

Hello new students! As I finish up my summer internship with the Careers Service and head into my fourth year and final year, I’m thinking about what it was like when I started Uni and what I would have wanted to know.

Firstly, get involved. I’m sure I’m not the first, and won’t be the last, to tell you that University is a great time to try out new activities and take every opportunity that comes your way. Joining a sport or society is not only an excellent way to meet people, but potentially a valuable experience to talk about in future job interviews.

Similarly, it’s not too early to get work experience. I’m glad I got a part-time job in first year when I had more time, and…

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How light and sound give physicists a clearer picture of cancer – UoE alumni success

Michal Tomaszewski, who graduated as the top student on Mathematical Physics degree, is currently working on his PhD in cancer research at Cambridge and you can listen to him explain his ground breaking work in this video clip

Michal followed an interesting path. He did a business internship in the City and gained experience from various financial institutions before he changed his path to cancer research.   Having done a purely theoretical degree he is now at home in a wet lab.

It just shows:

  1. it’s good to try different things to work out where your preferences lie
  2. starting in one area doesn’t mean you have to stay there
  3. no matter what you do, you develop personally and professionally from it

SpaceX & HypED in Los Angeles

Great blog post from physics students Enrique Cervero and Hamish Geddes – members of the Edinburgh University Hyperloop Team (HypED).

Want to know more about the space sector? Check out the Careers Service resource: Your Future in the Space industry

Hyperloop 1

The team working on the pod at the Innspace in Sanderson Building

“We are just back from our trip to California for the SpaceX Hyperloop competition, it’s been an amazing experience. We would once again like to thank the School of Physics for the support they gave us for our trip.

The Edinburgh University Hyperloop Team (HypED) has been working for over ten months to design and build an Hyperloop prototype, a method of levitating transportation propelled along a vacuum tube. Much of our summer was spent at the mechanical lab in Kings Building drawing sketches, tightening bolts and drilling holes with the ultimate purpose of bringing our Hyperloop Pod, Poddy McPodface, to life.

All this work was to culminate at the end of August in Los Angeles, where HypED was invited to by SpaceX to participate in the finals of one of the most prestigious engineering competitions in the world: The Hyperloop Pod Competition II. A total of 25 teams from all over the world were invited to unveil and race their prototypes at the space company’s headquarters, HypED being the only British team and one of four European teams.

The team arrived to LA about a week before the competition. We brought our prototype to a local workshop in Los Angeles, Urban Workshop, where we spent most of the pre-competition days giving the final touches to our design.

Hyperloop 2

The team working on the hydraulics at the workshop in LA

Our main worry before the competition was that we would not finish our pod in time, that there would be something, some flaw or eventuality, that we had not planned for and that would ultimately prevent us from competing at SpaceX. We all worked hard either way, trying to get everything done perfectly to meet SpaceX’s requirements.

When the pod was done, we drove it to SpaceX in Hawthorne, LA, where it was to be tested for safety, systems and functionality before the competition. Out of the 25 teams that got invited to the competition, only 3 would be allowed to test their pod and race it in the vacuum tube. HypED’s prototype was unfortunately not one of the 3 chosen by SpaceX. However, our team was given clearance to test our pod at a speed of 40m/s (144km/h) in the vacuum track, which would have made it one of the fastest Hyperloop Pods ever tested.

Over the entire year and competition, I have learned that real world applications of engineering are never simple and require a level head and persistence to complete: there must be a lot of thought put into a design, many drafts, scraps and failures need to be done before arriving at the finalised product.

I have also acquired a lot of technical experience, how to use industrial machinery, solve real world mechanical problems and work as a team to bring our ideas to life.

The outcome of the competition was also an imperative learning experience for the team which we will definitely use to our advantage in next year’s competition. We will take from our design flaws and mistakes and remove them in our next design, use the advice and knowledge given to us by Tesla and SpaceX engineers, and improve on our design’s advantages.

Hyperloop 3

The team with our completed pod next to SpaceX’s vacuum Hyperloop test track