Summer internships for students & graduates

Employ.ed in an SME – The Careers Service is working with a number of small and medium sized organisations to offer exclusive internships to our students and recent graduates. All internships are paid and some are supported with match funding from Santander Universities. If the internship is supported by Santander (details in advert), then the internship is only open to final year students and recent graduates.  

Internships are being advertised on MyCareerHub from 25th March – 7th April .  

Find out more here  

#Employ.edinanSME #ExperienceWorks #SantanderUniUK 

Covid-19 statement 

The Careers Service is continuing to operate a service and deliver this programme during the Coronavirus pandemic. We’re doing this remotely, in line with University and Government guidelines and in the interests of your health and safety.     

We understand that the coronavirus (covid-19) pandemic is causing a lot of global uncertainty and the situation is constantly and rapidly changing.  You might be unsure about making an application at this time, however the organisations advertising through the programme currently have every intention of hiring for their internship. However, as you can understand the situation is unpredictable and it is possible that this will have an impact as the recruitment process progresses through these uncertain times. For example, you might have a virtual interview and/or internship, or the organisation might need to postpone the start date or cancel an internship before hiring.   

The Careers Service and the organisations you apply to will keep you updated as far as we can.  

Careers Service Covid -19 information: https://www.ed.ac.uk/careers/about-us/coronavirus-faqs 

University Covid 19 updates: https://www.ed.ac.uk/news/covid-19 

Games industry in Edinburgh

There are eight towns and cities in the country where the games industry generates over £60m in GVA into the local economy (Edinburgh, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Leamington Spa, Crawley and Horsham, Manchester, Guildford, Slough and Heathrow, and London). 55% of game development jobs in the UK are based outside of London and the South East, according to a new regional economic impact report released by the video games and interactive entertainment industry trade body Ukie. “

Dundee comes in at number 10. While Edinburgh’s position may be boosted by the juggernaut that is Rockstar North, there are some other local industry “players” to be aware of who will be coming to our Careers in Tech & Data Fair on 12 February

We have a new gaming company coming – Mooncollider – based in Edinburgh and Codeplay who work with the games industry.   Sumdog are also attending and, as well as EdTech, who could be described as gamified education. If you are interested in computer gaming, talk to companies like Fanduel about their fantasy sports business.

Other exhibitors cover AI/Machine Learning, Space & Satellites, Agritech, Cyber Security, Fintech, Marketing and Advertising, MedTech, Tourism and much more.

Over 50% are recruiting from any discipline. Around 50% are SMEs
Around 90% have graduate roles. Around 60% have other paid work experience

Find out more here

From Physics grad to EY consultant

Huge thanks to Gemma King, physics graduate, for this insightful post on how she uses the skills gained from her degree and extra-curricular activity in her current role.

Despite loving studying Physics at University I determined fairly early on I wasn’t destined for a career in academia.  During my degree I was fortunate to have the opportunity to study Technology and Innovation Management, and it was this class that attracted me to business and the opportunities to transfer my scientific skills to this setting.  Engaging with my University’s Careers Service, I attended presentations run by professional services organisations and industry focussed companies to gain an understanding of the potential roles I would be suited to.

Consulting really stood out to me as a career route due to the need for a diverse skill-set and the emphasis on continuous learning, whilst enthusiastic presentations from EY attracted me to the company, coupled with its focus on people and development.  I was therefore delighted to join EY as a Performance Improvement Consultant in March 2017.

Whilst in my day-to-day role I’m not applying my technical Physics knowledge, I do rely on a number of the skills that I developed in my degree: a methodical approach to data, being able to systematically analyse that data and draw key conclusions, as well as the ability to succinctly convey these results to the wider team.

Positively, I’ve also been able to draw on the skills I developed through extra-curricular activities.  Serving as a Class Representative and President of the Grad Ball Committee gave me a great opportunity to work as part of diverse teams allowing me to develop my communication skills as well reinforcing managing tasks whilst working toward a common goal.

Gaining professional experience was also a valuable learning opportunity.  Between my penultimate and final year of University I undertook an internship in banking which allowed me to consider where I would like to focus my professional career.

Studying Physics has allowed me develop numerous transferable skills that have strongly supported me so far in my professional career.  Reflecting back on my own final years at University, I believe the most valuable advice I received that I would pass on is to engage with individuals working in the field you’re interested in, seek out opportunities to learn more and broaden your skill-set, and definitely do not see your Physics degree as a limitation to success in business.

CERN @ KB: grad roles & work experience offers

CERN will be on campus on 4th October – full details and signup will be on MyCareerHub

CERN offers tremendous opportunities for the right students to develop their skills and understanding through some of the most exciting and cutting edge projects in engineering, computing and physics.

Research STFC

Come along to this event to get an insight into engineering at CERN, with a talk from a senior CERN engineer on the experiments, facilities & what their work involves. This will be followed by a Q&A for which he will be joined by a representative of the CERN HR Talent Acquisition team who will introduce all opportunities at CERN.

CERN’s Summer Student Scheme and Technical Studentships are being advertised now on the Science & Technology Facilities Council site. Find out more on the STFC website.

How light and sound give physicists a clearer picture of cancer – UoE alumni success

Michal Tomaszewski, who graduated as the top student on Mathematical Physics degree, is currently working on his PhD in cancer research at Cambridge and you can listen to him explain his ground breaking work in this video clip

Michal followed an interesting path. He did a business internship in the City and gained experience from various financial institutions before he changed his path to cancer research.   Having done a purely theoretical degree he is now at home in a wet lab.

It just shows:

  1. it’s good to try different things to work out where your preferences lie
  2. starting in one area doesn’t mean you have to stay there
  3. no matter what you do, you develop personally and professionally from it

From Mathematical Physics to MThree Consulting

Mthree-web  tim woolins

Tim Woolins, Mathematical Physics graduate, University of Edinburgh

I have been working in production support through the Alumni Graduate Programme by MThree Consulting for just over a year, placed on the Deutsche Bank trade floor as a primary contact for front office, specifically the European Rates & Credit desks. My day to day work involves working with traders, developers & business analysts over a wide range of topics from risk/PnL to e-trading. To say it’s a challenging role would be fair, though not for the reasons I initially expected.

I quickly found that some skills I thought would be absolutely necessary to function in such an environment redundant, and things that I already had by virtue of my studies at university were far more valuable than I realised. I can safely say that being presented with a problem, and being able to take logical steps to find a solution on my own is one that I took for granted that I developed during my time at university.

If I could offer my former self one piece of advice, it would be to start earlier.

I knew I was not going into academia any further, and knowing orbital mechanics or quantum field theory is definitely not integral to my job, the value of the degree is in the underlying skills gained during your studies. Perhaps most useful of all is the ability to quickly understand new ideas and abstract concepts. Look over a wide variety of roles, for something you have a genuine interest in, and if you apply yourself you will excel with ease.

Tim Woolins, Production Support Analyst – MThree Alumni

 

Careers Scholarship Summer Programme 2017

It was great to work with some of the students doing project placements as part of this programme.  It’s a competitive programme open to students in later years of their BSc or MPhys.

This year I offered two sessions. The first one was co-delivered with Ross Galloway, the academic in the School whose remits includes this programme. This was to prepare students for their placements (academic & industry), address any questions and concerns and help them move confidently into their project placements.

The second one today was to help students  reflect on what they did, what went well, what went less well, how they coped with the challenges and how it might influence future career plans.

Importantly, it was also about  how to present what they gained from doing the project. There was lots of animated discussion, constructive peer feedback and hopefully everyone felt a lot more confident  about how to talk about their project and what it means they can do.

I also think those in the group today will do a much better job at the end-of-placement presentation event as well as in future applications, interviews and networking events.

Big win for the School of Physics – 3rd place out of 300 UK university teams

IBM UBC final all 5The IBM Universities Business Challenge (UBC) Worldwide is the world’s longest established undergraduate simulation-based competition designed to develop employability and enterprise skills and starts with 300 teams across the UK.

Facilitated by Susan Bird (Careers Consultant, School of Physics & Astronomy), the School submitted two teams, one team making the semi-final in Edinburgh. After a keynote introduction from Shelagh Green, (Director, Careers Service), the teams did a series of intensive, timed business simulations culminating in a 60 second innovation pitch.

The Physics undergraduate team – students Imran Marwat (team leader), Fidel Elie, Ziyi Zhang, Adamos Spanashis and Brandon Christman – not only won 2nd place at the semi-final – but also won Best Business Idea on the day, beating 19 teams from other UK universities.

The School funded the team’s travel & accommodation expenses to the London final, the team was mentored by Mike Ross from Standard Life Investments & supported by the Careers Service – a good example of how we work with Schools & industry partners to support the employability and professional development of our science students.

The UoE team of physicists went on to win third place in the final gaining a prize of £250 and beating a number of business teams from universities across the UK.  A real coup for the School of Physics & the University of Edinburgh.

Here’s how team member Ziyi Zhang reflected on the Challenge:

“Thank you for being at the competition and supporting us throughout this experience. I realized studying physics not only made us “book smart” but also taught us critical and logical thinking which can be applied beyond academics.

Combined with creativity and hard work, physicists can be successful in any field of our interest. We should all branch out to areas outside of our textbook, and explore our hidden potential.”